Agnus Dei - Nicholas White - Choir, Organ, and Brass Edition

Agnus Dei - Nicholas White - Choir, Organ, and Brass Edition
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Price: $1.50
Product ID : SY683
Weight: 0.06 lbs
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Min/Max Order: 4 / -

Description

CHOIR & ORGAN EDITION

4 pgs., 8.5" x 11"
Minimum Order of 4




This is a musical setting of the Agnus Dei by Nicholas White for choir and congregation with organ accompaniment and optional brass.


OTHER PURCHASE OPTIONS

(1) Conductor, Full Score Edition for Choir, Brass, and Organ as a digital download (PDF) with a print license. After completeing your order you will receive a link via email to download the pdf and your print license.
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(2) Parts for the Brass Ensemble as a digital download (PDF) with a print license. After completeing your order you will receive a link via email to download the pdf and your print license.



HISTORY OF THE AGNUS DEI IN THE LITURGY
According to the Liber pontificalis Pope Sergius I (687- 701) introduced the Agnus dei into the liturgy. It was at that time a chant sung by both the clergy and the laity to accompany the breaking of the bread before the communion. The text was comprised of one simple petition: "Agnus dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis." ("Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us"). The assembly continued to sing the phrase until the pope gave the sign that the fraction was completed.

During the Carolingian period the Agnus dei was reduced to a tripartite repetition of the supplication. In several of the early sources, though, the second petition was changed to reflect the language of the "Gloria in excelsis":

Agnus Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei qui sedes ad dexteram patris, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.

Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, who sits at the right hand of the father, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.

Around the year 1000 the "Agnus Dei" assumed the textual form that eventually became standard:

Agnus Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis.
Agnus Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, dona nobis pacem. (Lamb of God....grant us peace.)






About Nicholas White


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